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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 20
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
but seattle, vancouver, and portland and eugene. we had major business markets and the opportunity for mark -- travelers who are tourists to enjoy our real. for us, it would not work to start from scratch and institute a high-speed rail line. we have too many committees linking threat that west coast corridor that wanted to enjoy the benefits of rail and wanted us as a state contributing in putting our state dollars into it, they wanted to see the benefits in that incremental fashion. for us, washington state will always be a higher spped passenger rail program. but it works for us and our businesses. as we work closely with the burlington on this notion of sharing the corridor, it is a decision we made. they have bought into it and the nation for us in the amount of increments and passenger trips that we intend to make, the investments we're making on that freight rail line will not only benefit passenger travel but our freight movement in our state as we are a multi dependent trade state and at the economy recovers and their business continues to grow. we think the investments will help u
as the chief of police for seattle washington where he left crime at its lowest point in 40 years. [applause] >> good morning. thank you very much for being here. this is a wonderful opportunity for me to associate again on this month -- monitoring the future report. in the -- the assistant secretary of health could not be a stronger partner and the responsibility we have as adults for young people are particularly important. i am looking forward to hearing from you. it is always a great pleasure to be with dr. johnson who has given us the information that helps so much in that not only making policy but also the information needed to improve the nation's health, in particular the health of young people. there are a couple of important things i really took from this report. to put it a little bit into context, remembered this is a snapshot of the prior year. i think it is helpful to think about where we have been in the drug abuse and feel for the past number of decades. actually, over the past three decades. as we craft policy, it is helpful to take a look at that. we have made huge strides
you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was that generation's version of 2008. when that collapse happened, what you had was unsustainable debts, irresponsible banking. you had the collapse of the currency. it is what we have not now in greece
antonio tx or me living in concord or seattle for miami. you can make it directly relevant and interesting to cuba's lives. the more interest there will be. >> thank you so much to each of you for coming. i want to draw on a couple of things. as the education director with the power and passion of my generation wanting -- one of the things that i think is so critically missing is clear pathways to support the translation of informed inspiration and its desire to be part of interaction. i was curious it, if we had to lift up in a three-year window, how do we prioritize the leverage point in terms of production? is it a rebate system? will it make a difference in the general public? my generation of young people would want to be a solution to the change. >> that is a whole other panel. as scientists, our job is to solidify the suns with the best possible information. honestly, i am thankful that i am not in policy making because that is the hardest thing to do. but i believe that there is a great amount of low-hanging fruit. there are a lot of things that we can do, leaving climate out of it
through. jason is on our line from -- for republicans calling from seattle, washington. caller: thank you for taking my call. ms. summers, you exhibit the knowledge that is rarely seen on the "washington journal" about things of this nature. one senators set to another senator, we should just go over the -- 1 senator said to another senator, we should just go over the cliff. i do not know if people would be happy if they paid attention to her little conference. i appreciate your knowledge of sequestration. guest: thank you so much for your call. i actually spoke to senator patty murray. she said, let's just go over the cliff and see what happens. we have been calling them the cliff jumpers. she said to me, if there is not some kind of fix -- see is optimistic there would be one -- that would be detrimental for washington and outside of the seattle area. that is a concern i am hearing from her and other representatives from the states of washington. despite the rhetoric that sometimes goes on on capitol hill, that is something she is concerned about. she recognizes how important that is. t
-- for republicans calling from seattle, washington. caller: thank you for taking my call. ms. summers, you exhibit the knowledge that is rarely seen on the "washington journal" about things of this nature. one senators set to another senator, we should just go over the -- 1 senator said to another senator, we should just go over the cliff. i do not know if people would be happy if they paid attention to her little conference. i appreciate your knowledge of sequestration. guest: thank you so much for your call. i actually spoke to senator patty murray. she said, let's just go over the cliff and see what happens. we have been calling them the cliff jumpers. she said to me, if there is not some kind of fix -- see is optimistic there would be one -- that would be detrimental for washington and outside of the seattle area. that is a concern i am hearing from her and other representatives from the states of washington. despite the rhetoric that sometimes goes on on capitol hill, that is something she is concerned about. she recognizes how important that is. that is what i got out of my conversation with
watching football and drinking budweiser. host: sarah, democratic caller, seattle, washington, you are next. caller: hello? host: you are on the air. good morning. caller: i know a lot of people is talking about the 1%. i do not think a lot of americans notice that. i used to work for that 1%. they pay you $60 per week, they pay out the difference and give you cash so that they do not have to pay taxes. people shopping at bloomingdale's and all of these stores, they buy it before it hits the rack. the way that they perceive us is as dweebs. they do not like us and never have liked us. you think we are talking about the 74%? the 37%? they do not understand that we work hard. americans are the hardest working people. we have to jobs, three jobs, many of us are going back to school. we are not sitting around doing nothing. host: this prediction from facebook. these comments, democrats -- host: from bragg on facebook -- host: let me give you some other headlines as we continue this discussion this morning about the fiscal cliff. this is from "the washington post." "egyptian opposition confused
. host: alan from seattle washington, republican line -- caller: i'm not going to miss the joe walsh, the republican from illinois. because he called the president a liar. host: ok, we will leave it there. those are some of the people who will be missed and not missed. we have a few more minutes before we wrap up our program today. another program comes to you live tomorrow. columbia, south carolina, caller: hello, there. i write -- i like seeing jim dementing going. he is the poorest excuse for a senator i have seen in my lifetime. he did nothing to try to achieve consensus amongst his peers. he did nothing for his constituents here in south carolina. he will be in good company at the heritage fund. host: what you think of him going to the heritage foundation? caller: he will not be worth much. i'm sorry to see dennis kucinich leaving. he was a treasure to have. as a mayor and representative for the city of cleveland. host: chesapeake, va., independent line. you are the last call. caller: i miss ronald reagan and before that, george washington and thomas jefferson. host: anybody thi
than new york. los angeles, their minimum wage is $8, i think. i've lived in both states. seattle, these big expensive cities have the lowest minimum wage. you go to other states where living expenses are a little lower and they have a minimum wage, so i think congress needs to move minimum wage a little higher. it is a comparison between living expenses and that states minimum-wage is completely ridiculous. host: brian in connecticut, republican caller. caller: good morning. i guess my feeling on this is i don't think there's any place for the federal government to mandate to private businesses to increase the minimum wage. i think that, along with the added cost of the new taxes with obamacare, companies are already having to and did older books around. they are already cutting hours to get people under 30 hours. it does not add anything, if anything -- i don't think minimum-wage was never supposed to be -- the idea of getting your first job at minimum wage, you were supposed to get that and then move on to a better job. by raising the minimum wage, the federal government's idea
. the daughter now 19-20 years old. mike from houston, texas. chip from seattle, washington. caller: how's it going? i just have a quick question. i believe the country was built on innocent until proven guilty. it certainly seems like gun owners at large are guilty until they otherwise prove themselves to be a good guy or innocent. i have a tough time rationalizing what i hear about the innocent until proven guilty. we have this idea because of this one horrific act that everyone is now guilty of possibly being subjected to doing the same thing. host: what you do as a society? it not only deals with gun- control, but wayne lapierre also blaming the entertainment industry and whether we need to do a better job arming schools. there are a lot of issues coming into play. caller: there are and it would take too long to address all of them. i believe in individual rights. i'm not trying to attack anyone of these individual rights. how'd we make sure the crazy people, criminals, how do we keep the guns out of their hands? we have a litany of laws are rare that are not well in forest. gun show
you feel hopeless? >> i don't know why, i mean, i should have moved back to seattle, washington to my family. it never entered my mind. i was 29 years old. i had the cutest kids on earth. here's a side story, men would say they like me. i was pretty. you have three children? where do they live? i would say they live with me, you jerk. where do you think they live, they are my children. no, i was always an activist. i was always an activist, always a leader. it never entered my mind that we weren't going to get through this. but i was educated. i had good job skills. i was articulate and you know i had a lot of spine. i wasn't afraid for asking what was due. i was outspoken, that is a better word to say. i was healthy and my children were healthy. a lot of welfare recipients they aren't any of that. i would say to my friends i don't know how these other women do this that don't have the advantages that i have? they would look at me like what do you care about these other women you are struggling. i cared. that's what i brought with me. i was an executive at an electronics company and o
. it is the top hospitals like baylor, seattle, and ucla. they come to the conclusion that 30% of health care is waste in the delivery system. they took nine of the major treatments that they consider to be infeert and did an in depth analysis on on how the treatments should be given. even within those high-end delivery systems, for example, on a knee replacement there is a difference between $2,000 and $20,000 to do the total knee replacement but the quality of the outcome is the same. by using statistics they believe they can reduce the cost of health care by zpwretion quality of health care. for knee replacements if they are close to $1 billion a year. washington has trouble with things that work. it has to always go back to reducing providers, increasing the cost to recipients rather than allowing experimentation that occurs in the states like the governor of tennessee did to become the drivers of better policy. how we ship the paradigm here in washington, we actually reward creative ideas like the health care clabtive is the essence on how we get an agreement. moving to an outcomes the v
to seattle, we went to disneyland, which was most important. we traveled to kansas where my grandmother's family was from. we went to chicago and yellowstone. we took greyhound buses. we stayed at local motels or howard johnson's. and if there was a pool, i would be very excited. the vending machine that i was excited about. this was a time when you did not have 24 hours worth of cartoons. it was what my parents decided to watch. my mother would turn on the tv every night. i can say that i understood everything that was brought to me. but i knew the issues were important. thinking about what we would be as americans. during the course of this ship that lasted about a month, some of this got into my head. the person that fascinated me most was this man of japanese descent with one arm speaking in baritone, full of dignity and grace. maybe he captivated my attention because my mom explain to this was the center. -- was our senator. he was a upholding what our government was all about. maybe it was a boyhood fascination with the story of how he lost his arm in the war. but i think it was m
are in seattle. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. fixed exchange rates. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to the collapse of 1939, which was that generation's version of 2008. when that collapse happened, what you had was unsustainable debts coming irresponsible banking -- unsustainable that's, irresponsible banking. you had the collapse of the currency. it is what we have not now increase, exactly the same. -- in greece, exactly the same. the generation that came to power in 1932 were exceptionally fearful of what would happen to the united states of america after 19
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)